Christian Leadership & Spirituality: new sermon series to begin in January

There’s a lot of information and ideas about leadership, with neat and tidy checklists of how to be a good leaders and what good leaders do. But how does one’s identity in Christ factor in? In this series we’ll explore connections between leadership and spirituality from a different angle, beginning with Jesus’ own baptism. This series will begin on January 12, 2020 and run through February 23, 2020. We’ll also be doing a group study of a brand new book Another Way: Living and Leading Change on Purpose, which will be released for publication on January 21st. That study will begin the week of February 9.

Nightmares Before Christmas: an Advent and Christmas sermon series

Our sermon series for Advent and Christmas (begins December 1) is called “Nightmares Before Christmas.” In the Christmas song “O Little Town of Bethlehem” we find the lyrics “the hopes and fears of all the years are met in thee tonight.”

Christmas, while a time for celebration, can also be a difficult time for many people. The lights, decorations, and ambiance can only do so much to mask the pain that we often think should be set aside at a happy time like this.

Yet in Jesus, in celebrating the incarnation, we have a mixture of hopes and fears coming together, and we have a light that shines in the darkness.

Join us on Sundays at 10:30 a.m.

eXperience the Difference of Discipleship

On September 8 we’ll begin our new sermon series about what it means to be a disciple of Jesus. This series will take us on a journey in the gospel of Luke, while mixing in some letters, Hebrew scripture narratives, and prophets. During this journey, we’ll learn that it is not just what we believe that matters, but how we live out those beliefs in how we practice our faith.

Jesus says, “Follow me.” Are you ready to go on the journey?

Naked & Afraid

This week’s sermon, Naked & Afraid, is based on the story of the demoniac living among the tombs in Luke 8:26-39.

Jesus and his disciples sailed to the Gerasenes’ land, which is across the lake from Galilee. As soon as Jesus got out of the boat, a certain man met him. The man was from the city and was possessed by demons. For a long time, he had lived among the tombs, naked and homeless. When he saw Jesus, he shrieked and fell down before him. Then he shouted, “What have you to do with me, Jesus, Son of the Most High God? I beg you, don’t torture me!” He said this because Jesus had already commanded the unclean spirit to come out of the man. Many times it had taken possession of him, so he would be bound with leg irons and chains and placed under guard. But he would break his restraints, and the demon would force him into the wilderness.

Jesus asked him, “What is your name?”

“Legion,” he replied, because many demons had entered him. They pleaded with him not to order them to go back into the abyss. A large herd of pigs was feeding on the hillside. The demons begged Jesus to let them go into the pigs. Jesus gave them permission, and the demons left the man and entered the pigs. The herd rushed down the cliff into the lake and drowned.

When those who tended the pigs saw what happened, they ran away and told the story in the city and in the countryside. People came to see what had happened. They came to Jesus and found the man from whom the demons had gone. He was sitting at Jesus’ feet, fully dressed and completely sane. They were filled with awe. Those people who had actually seen what had happened told them how the demon-possessed man had been delivered. Then everyone gathered from the region of the Gerasenes asked Jesus to leave their area because they were overcome with fear. So he got into the boat and returned across the lake. The man from whom the demons had gone begged to come along with Jesus as one of his disciples. Jesus sent him away, saying, “Return home and tell the story of what God has done for you.” So he went throughout the city proclaiming what Jesus had done for him.

Teach Your Children

This week’s sermon will be “Teach Your Children,” based on the parable of the parable of the sower in Luke 8:4-10

“When a great crowd gathered and people from town after town came to him, he said in a parable:  “A sower went out to sow his seed; and as he sowed, some fell on the path and was trampled on, and the birds of the air ate it up. Some fell on the rock; and as it grew up, it withered for lack of moisture.  Some fell among thorns, and the thorns grew with it and choked it. Some fell into good soil, and when it grew, it produced a hundredfold.” As he said this, he called out, “Let anyone with ears to hear listen!”
Then his disciples asked him what this parable meant.  He said, “To you it has been given to know the secrets of the kingdom of God; but to others I speak in parables, so that ‘looking they may not perceive, and listening they may not understand.’”